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Now Shipibo

Music is such a vital component of our lives. We are born into a world where sounds constantly envelop us. When those sounds are arranged into a single harmony, a mother is able to put a baby to sleep through lullabies. As children, we sing along to TV jingles because they evoke the joy and simplicity that characterizes our youth. Even as adults, certain songs have the power to bring about deep, sometimes overwhelming memories and their associated emotions. As a jazz pianist, I have found that music is a central component of my life and my realizations surrounding energy and the universe. I have always searched for ways to draw bridges between music and art, and one of these ways is to visually represent music.

Aumaaz

Aumaaz

Acrylic on unstretched canvas, 54 x 108 inches, 2017

Music is energy; it is physically manifested as a vibration that is propogated through our sonic field. I Traditions spanning the globe have been inspired by music in their enactment of religious and cultural histories; many have attempted to visually capture the cosmic energy that music represents.


Mabulla

Mabulla

Acrylic on unstretched canvas, 54 x 144 inches, 2018

One such tradition is the Shipibo tribe from the Peruvian Amazon. Artisans from this ancient tribe create geometric patterns in response to chants, or Icaros, sung by the local shamans. These patterns have inspired the series entitled Now-Shipibo, where energy is treated as sonic vibration that saturates large, un-stretched fabric laid on the floor and painted over the course of a few weeks.

Evrin

Evrin

Acrylic on unstretched linen, 45 x 80 inches, 2017

The Shipibo tradition is important to me because I want to shift the focus from Eurocentric art to tribal creative traditions that have been operating in relative isolation for decades. Additionally, I have always been fascinated by synesthetic experiences that involve sight, sound, smell, and touch at the same time.

Rambuchi

Rambuchi

Acrylic on unstretched cotton fabric, 54 x 180 inches, 2017

The Now-Shipibo series introduces intimacy with the artwork by enabling you to touch the pieces, reflect on their aural history, and be visually captivated by the fluorescent paints used. Art does not have to operate on purely visual terms, as the Shipibo tradition so beautifully exemplifies.

Shubatiki

Shubatiki

Acrylic on unstretched cotton fabric, 72 x 72 inches, 2017

By creating an expression of the interchangeability between light and sound, The Now Shipibo tradition pushes the boundaries of art from a largely visual realm to something that is pluralistic, cross-disciplinary, and a treat for all the senses. The synesthesia achieved through the multi-sensorial, vibrational fusion of form, light, and sound enables viewers to transcend their reality in exchange for one ever more connected and peaceful.

Miramara

Miramara

Acrylic on unstretched cotton fabric, 54 x 144 inches, 2018

Kwarig

Kwarig

Acrylic on unstretched waxed cotton, 45 x 126 inches, 2018